Feeley Laboratory for Stem Cell Regeneration and Translational Research

1700 Owens Street, Room 361
San Francisco, CA 94158
Tel: 415-575-0546


Our work

 

Dr. Brian Feeley's research lab, which is located on the UCSF/VA Mission Bay campus, performs research on common shoulder and knee problems.  He has collaborated with Xuhui Liu, MD and Hubert Kim, MD and researchers at UCSF on developing models to study the molecular mechanisms and cellular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of muscle atrophy after rotator cuff tears.
Stem cells found within rotator cuff muscle can be stimulated into fibrotic tissue (red) or fat tissue (green) depending on the stimulus.  Researchers are evaluating tools to improve the function of these cells to improve outcomes after rotator cuff repair.
To learn more, visit the Feeley Lab web site.
Dr. Brian Feeley's research lab -- located on the UCSF/VA Mission Bay campus -- performs research on common shoulder and knee problems.  He has collaborated with Xuhui Liu, MD and Hubert Kim, MD and researchers at UCSF on developing models to study the molecular mechanisms and cellular mechanisms that are responsible for the development of muscle atrophy after rotator cuff tears.

 

Feeley Lab at UCSF

Our lab is located at 1700 Owens Street, Room 361, San Francisco, CA 94158.

Current projects

Our recent research has focused on understanding the interaction of the TGF-B and BMP signaling pathways and how they affect changes in the FAP stem cell population after rotator cuff injury. We are currently evaluating the relationship between these signaling pathways, beige adipose tissue (BAT), and FAP cells since both stem cell populations share similar markers of expression BAT has an important role in energy balance, and may produce local growth factors such as IGF-1 that can promote a healing environment for muscle. The emergence of BAT is of particular importance in RC injury given the clinical significance of FI. Our goal over the next five years is to expand our understanding of how these resident stem cells function in our mouse model of RC tears, and study these cell populations in patients undergoing RC repair.

Improving outcomes after rotator cuff repair

Stem cells found within rotator cuff muscle can be stimulated into fibrotic tissue (red) or fat tissue (green) depending on the stimulus.  Researchers are evaluating tools to improve the function of these cells to improve outcomes after rotator cuff repair.

Visit the Feeley Lab web site

Learn more about our research

Feeley Lab web site
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